Hariko

What is your ethnicity and nationality?

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Born American of parents born in America, but all the Grandparents are immigrants. Paternal Grandparents born in the Rhine Valley of Germany and actually met at Ellis Island as they immigrated in the mid 1920s. Maternal Grandparents both called themselves Sicilian. Grandfather born in Sicily but Materenal Grandmother born in Belfast and immigrated to the US when she was 16. Her parents where born in Sicily and were on there way to the US but ended up in Belfast for 17yrs making the money to get here.

So I've ALWAYS have been told I was half German and half Sicilian (you did NOT call yourself Italian in this house), however Grandma always called herself English/British. As such I grew up speaking fluent English, Italian and German. Still understand Italian and German when I here it, but it's an effort now to speak.

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Born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia. Both parents are Serbian and have been for several countable generations back. Might have just a tiny bit of russian and german, but basically that would be a generations and generations....and generations ago. 

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The racial and ethnic make-up of this thread has been put into chart format. White ethnicities are blue, Asian green, and African red.

 

77% of the people surveyed are white, 17% are mixed, and 6% are Asian. 80% of the ethnicities claimed are white, 15% are Asian, and 5% are African.

 

Compared to the US, this thread would overrepresent whites and Asians while underrepresenting blacks.

 

BB7FMDN.png

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Define white, then.
 

How are the race categories used in Census 2000 defined? “White” refers to people having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicated their race or races as “White” or wrote in entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Near Easterner, Arab, or Polish. “Black or African American” refers to people having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicated their race or races as “Black, African Am., or Negro,” or wrote in entries such as African American, Afro American, Nigerian, or Haitian. “American Indian and Alaska Native” refers to people having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintain tribal affiliation or community attachment. It includes people who indicated their race or races by marking this category or writing in their principal or enrolled tribe, such as Rosebud Sioux, Chippewa, or Navajo. “Asian” refers to people having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent. It includes people who indicated their race or races as “Asian Indian,” “Chinese,” “Filipino,” “Korean,” “Japanese,” “Vietnamese,” or “Other Asian,” or wrote in entries such as Burmese, Hmong, Pakistani, or Thai. “Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander” refers to people having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicated their race or races as “Native Hawaiian,” “Guamanian or Chamorro,” “Samoan,” or “Other Pacific Islander,” or wrote in entries such as Tahitian, Mariana Islander, or Chuukese. “Some other race” was included in Census 2000 for respondents who were unable to identify with the five Office of Management and Budget race categories. Respondents who provided write-in entries such as Moroccan, South African, Belizean, or a Hispanic origin (for example, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban) are included in the Some other race category.

 

Source: http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/cenbr01-1.pdf

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The problem with every census is that in every country they have different criteria and definitions, so what's understood in the USA facts and figures may make no logical sense to a French person for example, who may quite properly question the USA criteria and definitions -  even from a USA point-of-view!  

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Never mind the fact that "white" isn't even an ethnicity. It's a skin colour...? What's the point of dividing people by skin colour? It's not indicative of culture or beliefs or practice or anything at all really.

 

Why on earth would "white" include middle easterners anyway. They are neither white by skin colour nor "white" culturally.

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I was puzzled by that, too, given how different Jews, Arabs and N. Africans are from Europeans. Either way, it was all made up by some guy centuries ago going by essentially his opinion, I don't even consider myself "white", so much as "European-American".

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Pretty much the definition of "New Zealander", because we don't feel self conscious enough as a nation to classify people as that. So we call them NZ Europeans. I suppose that could be seen as colour based given it's separate from Maori, but I see it more as a cultural thing.

 

If we were going for skin colour we wouldn't give the other ethnic options like South African, German, etc

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American born and raised! My father's side is easy. Welsh ancestry but since the family came over on the Mayflower it's definitely ancestry. Mother's side is a little more complicated. A mix of central and eastern European nationalities, mostly Italian and Romanian.

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